Nonprofits have to make tough decisions about new technologies

July 29, 2013

Nonprofits have to make tough decisions about new technologies

Adapting to innovations in technology is a way of life for nonprofits as the cloud, big data, "bring your own device" policies and unified communication are all solutions that can make it easier for managers to stay in contact with their staff and improve efficiency throughout the organization. However, it's important that nonprofits have a virtual infrastructure that can support all of these state-of-the-art tools. 

New technologies continue to add up
Nonprofit managers want a team of staff members who never have issues communicating and have the tools they need to get work done both in and out of the office. According to the recently released "Sixth Annual State of the Network Global Study" from network and application performance management solutions provider Network Instruments, innovations are coming fast and furious.

Sixty-two percent of responding organizations have already begun using videoconferencing, roughly half of survey participants' applications will be managed in the cloud in the upcoming year and about one-quarter of entities forecasted their project bandwidth will grow between 25 and 50 percent in the next two years. Adjusting to these new technologies will help nonprofits keep track of donors better, improve their marketing initiatives and increase the potential of their workforce.

"Many technologies we spoke about as emerging a short time ago, such as BYOD, videoconferencing and 40GB, are quickly approaching mainstream status as companies look to quickly boost productivity and cost savings," said Jim Frey, vice president of research for Enterprise Management Associates.

Some nonprofits are behind the curve
While there nonprofits have been able to stay up-to-date on the latest technologies, others simply don't have the resources needed to invest in these new innovations. A blog post for The Nonprofit Roundtable stated a combined shortage of expertise, time and money is keeping organizations from getting new solutions that can greatly improve operations.

This phenomenon makes it difficult for nonprofits to be able to use technology effectively. For example, smaller budgets can leads to purchasing fewer technologies, as well as being unable to hire employees who know how to properly manage this innovations. A lack of staff members with tech skills cuts the amount of time the organization spends to research new innovations, according to the blog post.

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