Review your nonprofit’s New Year’s resolutions

June 9, 2014

Review your nonprofit’s New Year’s resolutions

Just like individuals and for-profit companies, many nonprofit decision-makers craft resolutions for the new year. Although the improvements nonprofits want to make depend on their individual situations, how long they've been in operation and their organizational mission, most nonprofits have set goals for 2014.

There are a few popular goals that many nonprofits have selected in one form or another. Here's some advice on jump-starting stalled efforts and guidance for those that have actively been making progress as well:

A focus on the current donor base and repeat giving
It's important to bring new contributors into the fold for the continued success of the nonprofit, but maintaining a current donor base is even more crucial. Focusing on outreach can help improve both contributor confidence and the gifts that these repeat donors provide, according to The Chronicle of Philanthropy. There are a variety of tactics nonprofits can use to keep donors coming back, including sending personalized thank-you notes and updates on how funds from a specific fundraising effort are being spent. Having some kind of outreach that isn't attached to a specific donation effort can make contributors feel valued as people, instead of just another set of contact information in a database.

Social media is a powerful tool
Another tactic nonprofits can utilize to reach their goals is increase social media usage like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as an effective, no- or low-cost way to reach out to their donor community. Social media can provide information about fundraising drives, news related to the mission of a nonprofit and can create awareness and conscious discussions. Because social networks can be such powerful tools, nonprofits should make sure they are allocating the appropriate resources to them. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation suggests that a staff member with education and experience in communication should be in charge of social media profiles. Additionally, nonprofits need to remember that communication is a two-way street – don't just post, but read and digest what others have to say. Then share those postings with key staff.

Content presented by First Nonprofit Group, the leading provider of state unemployment insurance solutions for 501(c)(3) nonprofit employers.

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